Author Topic: New Book for Anyone Interested in Early Rifles from Kentucky  (Read 596 times)

Offline Tanselman

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New Book for Anyone Interested in Early Rifles from Kentucky
« on: September 17, 2022, 07:29:34 AM »
Back in 2012 I published "Kentucky Gunmakers 1775-1900" in two volumes, "Gunmaking History" and "Biographies." Since that time, ongoing research has identified a few small gaps in the original narrative and over 200 new names of early Kentucky gunsmiths. As expected, the first volumes pulled out a large number of new guns, some very significant to the study of Kentucky gunmaking. Between all the new material, new rifles, and a few small gaps in the narrative, a final volume was needed. The new volume is subtitled "Epilogue;" it wraps up the study of Kentucky's early gunmaking with solid research, fine photography, and a number of new insights into early gunmaking.

"Epilogue" is not a stand-alone volume, but rather a complement to the first two volumes, “Gunmaking History” and Biographies,” and adds significantly to both volumes while illustrating important rifles from every gunmaking school [including two newly identified schools] in full color. New materials in this large format [9x12 pages] volume of 330 pages include:

Part A: Kentucky gunsmiths’ daily trials and tribulations are examined in short chapters that explore black gunsmiths in Kentucky; gunsmiths’ many skills and part-time jobs; injuries and deaths suffered by gunsmiths; interesting gunsmith anecdotes; gunsmithing dynasties in Kentucky, etc.   

Part B: Rifles from each of Kentucky’s gunmaking schools, including the new Clark County and the Cumberland Schools, are described and illustrated in large, full color images,

Part C: Over two hundred and fifty new Kentucky gunsmiths are documented, and over two hundred and thirty previously known Kentucky gunsmiths have expanded biographies.

The new books finally arrived this week. Price is $90 plus $10 packing/shipping. If interested, please contact me either through this web site, or by e-mail at sgallien@comcast.net. If you have more than a passing interest in early Kentucky firearms or early Kentucky Tansel powder horns, or want to get a good deal on purchasing all three volumes together, you may enjoy visiting my new web site, www.kentuckygunmakers.com.

Shelby Gallien




« Last Edit: September 17, 2022, 08:07:57 AM by Tanselman »

Offline mr. no gold

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Re: New Book for Anyone Interested in Early Rifles from Kentucky
« Reply #1 on: September 17, 2022, 09:22:39 AM »
Great news, Shelby! Save a copy for me, signed of course.Will send check next week. I am eager to see it and read it.  Can't beat the quality of your publications.
I have a rifle that may fit into your KY makers somewhere. Isn't that always the way it goes? It looks a lot like M. Sells work, but is probably not. Didn't he have a brother who made guns, too? Hand made 44" barrel and superb maple stock. It has a wild hand filed interpretation of the National Road PB. Will get some photos of it one of these days. Congratulations on the new volume!
Dick

Offline Nailcreek

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Re: New Book for Anyone Interested in Early Rifles from Kentucky
« Reply #2 on: September 17, 2022, 11:59:26 PM »
Shelby, I just placed my order ... would welcome your signature on all three volumes, if you might.

Thanks!

Kerry

Offline RAT

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Re: New Book for Anyone Interested in Early Rifles from Kentucky
« Reply #3 on: September 18, 2022, 09:40:12 PM »
I loved the first 2... just ordered this one. Can't wait to explore the Cumberland school.
Bob

Offline Tanselman

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Re: New Book for Anyone Interested in Early Rifles from Kentucky
« Reply #4 on: September 23, 2022, 07:07:07 AM »
I thought viewers might like to see the back cover on the new book, "Kentucky Gunmakers - Epilogue," since it shows a very interesting rifle. The signed "Wiliam Kelsay" rifle was found two years ago and brings the Cumberland School onto Kentucky soil. The Cumberland School had previously been found in Tennessee and followed the watershed of the Cumberland River. Its most noted makers were Thomas Simpson and Jacob Young, both from Sumner County in northern Tennessee just above Nashville. The Kelsay rifle has some details that suggest it might be earlier than Kentucky's William Kelsay's working years, but no other gunsmith named William Kelsay, particularly with the last name spelled with an "a" instead of "e" in "say" part, is known. A gunsmith named William Kelsay appeared back in Tennessee for the Industrial Census in 1820, but he appears to be the same man. The style of the rifle fits Kentucky's William Kelsay's working area where he began working in 1810. A second signed rifle was reported about a year ago, but it is stocked in walnut. However, it had the same robust, rather flat butt. It's fun to discuss and debate the possibilities... that's part of what makes longrifle collecting so enjoyable.

Shelby Gallien


« Last Edit: September 23, 2022, 07:10:56 AM by Tanselman »