Author Topic: left-handed Alex Henry/Staton/Bob Roller lock.Part2. Four post bridle and screws  (Read 1180 times)

Offline Rolf

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The blank
I made a pattern for the screw and axle holes by gluing a square piece of 3mm mild sheet steel to the lock plate pattern and drilling out the holes.


This pattern was then glued to the bridle blank, which is a 9,5mm thick piece of mild steel and the holes drilled out. Notice the hole for the tumbler axle is not drilled and the screw holes are drilled with the tapping drill size.


The pattern was removed, each screw hole enlarged with a 3.1mm clearance drill and counterbored with a 4.0mm endmill to a depth of 2mm for the screw heads, before moving to the next hole. This insures the counterbore is centered on the screw hole.


Next, I flipped the blank, put #4 screw blanks from Brownell in all the screw holes and milled away as much as I could of the waste material down 6,1mm with a 6mm and a 3mm endmill.


Shaping the posts.
First, I tried making a hollow mill from the same drill rod I used for the square broch. It dulled and stopped cutting after one and a half posts. I think I had annealed it too soft. I tried tempering it again, but it warped. I gave up on the hollow mill because making them is labor intensive and they are a pain to resharpen. Sorry, I forgot to take pictures of this attempt.

Next, I tried using the round table and a 3mm endmill. I mounted and centered the round table on the mill, as shown previously. I mounted a piece of 10mm thick mild steel on the table and drilled and tapped a 4-40 screw hole with both axis on the mill table locked.
 

The bridle blank was then mounted to the steel plate with #4-40 screw and clamped.


The head of the screw is 5,7mm in diameter. The X-axis is off set so the 3mm end mill barely clears the head when the table is rotated. I got nice round posts that were 6mm in diameter, but not centered on the screw holes. Something must have shifted.


I don’t think this would have impaired the function of the bridles, but it looks sloppy. I decided to recut the posts and make them slimer. I found this tool from ISCAR that worked like a dream. It’s a cutting insert for making round grooves for gaskets.  Here is the link https://www.iscar.com/eCatalog/Family.aspx?fnum=2546&mapp=TG&GFSTYP=M&rel=S&rcat=2800897&item2=&IC=
 I made a holder for the insert from 30mm axel rod.


The tool fits in my 16mm collet for the mill and cuts pillars 4,7mm in diameter. The blank is held in a mill vice and the placement of the pillar in relation to the screw hole can be easily adjusted using the x and y axis on the mill table. The recutting of the posts got rid of most of the offset and slimed them down.


Next, I drilled the hole in the blank for tumbler axel. I made a brass bushing from round stock. First, I center drilled it in the lathe from both ends with a 2mm drill before drilling through the whole piece with a 4mm drill. This gets rid of runoff. One end is turned down to 6,5mm so it fits in the tumbler hole in the lock plate.


The bridle blank is mounted on lock plate. This holds the blank level in the vice when drilling the axel hole.


I made a brass pattern for the bridle plate. The pattern is held in place by the bridle screws, the blank painted with dykem and scribed around, and drilled out with a 2mm drill.


Saw out the bridle and clean up with needle files.


Bridle screws.
I’ve tried several alternatives and have not found one jet that completely happy with. The best one so far is to use Brownell’s #4 screw blanks. They are way to long and the heads are too big. The blanks are very soft and carbide turning inserts only mushes it instead of cutting.
In this thread https://americanlongrifles.org/forum/index.php?topic=72984.0 , I was recommended to try high-speed steel turning tools. This worked like dream after honing the tool to a sharp point and polishing to 800 grit.

First, I turn the head down to 3.9mm, reverse the blank in the chuck with screw head behind the jaws so they only clamp on the shank.


I then cut the shank sticking out of the chuck down to 10mm and thread it in the lathe. The screw is still way long, but it is not possible to hold a shorter screw in the chuck. I need to start the threads in the lathe to insure them are not started crooked.


The rest of the threading is cut by hand while clamping it in a sjarn jig. The shank is very soft and prone to bending. It must be threaded in portions, max 10mm at a time.


The screw is mounted in the bridle/lock plate and cut to size.


Here is a couple of pictures of the finished bridle.


Next, I hope to start on the tumbler.
Best regards
Rolf
« Last Edit: September 28, 2022, 03:24:06 PM by Rolf »

Offline Bob Roller

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OUTSTANDING work.I have a smaller one started but never finished it and once this good looking bridle is done the rest of the lock is nothing more than a Hawken lock.I think there were 3 of us in America that made these Stantons,Bill Roberts was one and a man in Minnesota(I think)who posted here about them.They are both deceased and I stopped lock making in August of 2019 with 2 flintlocks as a last project.Rod England is using the  "3 pin"style which is just as rigid as the "4 pin"and his kits are excellent.Are you making a left hand version of the target rifles or do you plan a double barreled rifle or shotgun?Keep us in the loop and thank you for the tutorials as the job advances.
Bob Roller

Online Carl Young

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Thank you Rolf. Not only do you display superior skills and creativity, but you are an excellent teacher as well.

Keep up the great work and please continue posting.

Best regards,
Carl
Already long ago, from when we sold our vote to no man, the People have abdicated our duties; for the People who once upon a time handed out military command, high civil office, legions ó everything, now restrains itself and anxiously hopes for just two things: bread and circuses. -Juvenal

Offline runastav

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Great work Rolf ;)
Runar

Offline flatsguide

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Rolf, thanks for the extended effort to photograph your fine work. Itís a pleasure to watch you work.
Cheers Richard

Online Curtis

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That is some awesome work Rolf!!  And I appreciate what you are doing it even more because I am left handed as well!!  ;)


Curtis
Curtis Allinson
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Sometimes, late at night when I am alone in the inner sanctum of my workshop and no one else can see, I sand things using only my fingers for backing

Offline Bob Roller

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Some time ago I made a pair of these "4 pin" locks and as far as I know they were never used.The problem today would be making a breech plug.Doable but not easy.Has any ever seen one of these rifles with a left side breech? This shouldn't be a problem for someone who kakes breech plugs.I helped Bill Large from time to time making bolster breech plugs but have no memory of even one left sided.
Bob Roller

Offline LynnC

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Rolf,

The work, the time, the care, the patience. Wow!  I have made parts like you occasionally when I had no choice but You sir are a dedicated craftsman and I admire your efforts.

Please keep posting and inspiring us!
The price of eggs got so darn high, I bought chickens......

Offline Rolf

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Thank you all for your kind words.

The main object of this build is to practice lock building. I'm trying to learn lock building before I attempt to put together several cast sets I've accumulated from Blackley, Ron Scott and a few others.  I have to make the "guts" for most of the kits. If I mess up a cast part, it is almost impossible to replace. If I mess up one of my scratch builds, it's just a chunk of steel. Also, some of the locks I want are not available as kits or finished locks. Often the only option is to build from scratch.

I do hope to use one of the locks on an English target rifle, sometime in the future, don't know when. At the moment I am working on a left-handed Beck rife, got the patch box and carving left to do. When that's done, I plan to start on a left-handed Fleeger style rifle and I'm thinking of using one of the locks on it. I have made left-handed breech plugs. Here is a link to the last one I did. https://americanlongrifles.org/forum/index.php?topic=60864.msg609789#msg609789

Best regards
Rolf

Offline JBJ

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Simply outstanding work and I know I speak for many others in expressing my appreciation for the detailed photos and the explanations. Many thanks.

J.B.

Offline Bob Roller

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Even after I had gained the skills and machinery,I never had this level of dedication to the work of reproducing anything but the 3 and 4 screw locks and now even they are off my "to do" list. YOU have a natural talent for these jobs and that is obvious and you have bought machinery and hand tools to work with.Your tutorials are outstanding and easy to follow.Being able to make odd tools like hollow mills is a bigger help than most of us realize.To MAKE tools you must HAVE tools.
   Now to another subject.I have 3 "Virginia" style triggers to make and at this point in time I am stalled.We are having the front porch remade and my wife's blood pressure is beyond stroke level and she has A-fib this morning of over 110 beats a minute so my shop is closed until this is under control.She is trying to put up a "front" but I told her I will not leave her alone as in past years and will take care of laundry and other chores.This has happened before but now is another situation.
Bob Roller
« Last Edit: October 03, 2022, 04:13:39 PM by Bob Roller »

Offline Marcruger

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I never cease to be amazed at the skill of folks on these boards.  Super work Rolf.  And yes, thank you very much for the excellent photos!   God Bless,   Marc