Author Topic: Medium sized early lobed horn  (Read 827 times)

Offline rich pierce

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Medium sized early lobed horn
« on: January 15, 2023, 06:31:12 PM »
A dear friend gave me this for my collection of plain horns. It feels owner-made, not as thin as ďprofessionalĒ horns. I am debating adding a plug, simple wafer of flat pine. Maybe not.





Andover, Vermont

Offline Tim Crosby

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Re: Medium sized early lobed horn
« Reply #1 on: January 15, 2023, 07:48:34 PM »
 Neat horn, I think I'd leave it as is since it will probably not be used again and it shows the inside. Which is probably not interesting to anyone but me.

  Tim

Offline rich pierce

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Re: Medium sized early lobed horn
« Reply #2 on: January 15, 2023, 08:26:19 PM »
Neat horn, I think I'd leave it as is since it will probably not be used again and it shows the inside. Which is probably not interesting to anyone but me.

  Tim
And a couple other oddballs like me!
Andover, Vermont

Offline Tim Crosby

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Re: Medium sized early lobed horn
« Reply #3 on: January 15, 2023, 09:55:10 PM »
 Looks almost like a liner in it or is that where it is separating?

     Tim

Offline rich pierce

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Re: Medium sized early lobed horn
« Reply #4 on: January 15, 2023, 10:03:21 PM »
De-laminating, looks like.
Andover, Vermont

Offline Top Jaw

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Re: Medium sized early lobed horn
« Reply #5 on: January 15, 2023, 11:29:32 PM »
Nice early horn.  Iíd have to look it over first. But I would consider putting a pine base back in it to protect it long-term. And If I did, I would age it and grunge it accordingly.  For instance the divot that is out of the side I would also take out of a portion of the base.  And I might also rub some olive oil or similar on the inside and edge of the base to get some moisture back in it.  Not necessarily on the outside surface, as that sometimes removes good dirt and patina.  I have done this to a couple of horns as a restoration project, to help save them long term.  My 2 cents. 

Offline Bob Gerard

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Re: Medium sized early lobed horn
« Reply #6 on: January 16, 2023, 04:03:34 AM »
Itís a cool old horn. Stuff like that lends me to imagine about its life.
Unfortunately it looks like it would leak now a days ☺️

Offline JSMOSBY

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Re: Medium sized early lobed horn
« Reply #7 on: January 16, 2023, 05:48:24 PM »
Nice early horn.  Iíd have to look it over first. But I would consider putting a pine base back in it to protect it long-term. And If I did, I would age it and grunge it accordingly.  For instance the divot that is out of the side I would also take out of a portion of the base.  And I might also rub some olive oil or similar on the inside and edge of the base to get some moisture back in it.  Not necessarily on the outside surface, as that sometimes removes good dirt and patina.  I have done this to a couple of horns as a restoration project, to help save them long term.  My 2 cents.

Stabilize.  Do not restore.  Bottom line, it's your horn to do with as you please to enjoy.  BTW, olive oil and similar become rancid over time.

Offline Top Jaw

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Re: Medium sized early lobed horn
« Reply #8 on: January 17, 2023, 02:47:43 AM »
JSMOSBY

Just curious on the reluctance to restore, (which also stabilizes in the process). 
Old rifles are restored all the time.  Why shouldnít accouterments also be?  Itís not a value thing in the case of a horn like this.  The time spent to do it would eat up any value gained. 
Itís not counterfeiting.   Itís doing something that would have been done to the horn if damaged during its useful life, to keep it going in stable working order.
Again, one mans opinion on the topic.  But I see no harm, and actually a benefit- if done properly, tastefully, and in keeping with the design and age appropriateness if the horn.  Or most any accoutrement.

Offline RAT

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Re: Medium sized early lobed horn
« Reply #9 on: January 17, 2023, 03:31:31 AM »
From your post above...

"I would age it and grunge it accordingly"

Some may look at that as an attempt at "fakery". It makes future owners (and sellers) believe the restoration is, in fact, original to the artifact. I'm not against restoration by adding a plug, but it should be readily identified as new work and not original to the horn.

Bob

Offline rich pierce

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Re: Medium sized early lobed horn
« Reply #10 on: January 17, 2023, 05:04:23 AM »
Itís a hundred dollar horn, restored, on a very good day at a gun show. I think itís good to keep these things in perspective.

Iíll restore the heck out of $200 percussion Birmingham doubles all day and not mark them or worry about it. Everybody knows the best they will ever be is a bunch of ďshootersĒ.  Same for beater, no-name late percussion rifles.

A thousand dollar gun or horn is a different deal.

That being said, itíll remain as it was given to me.
Andover, Vermont

Offline Top Jaw

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Re: Medium sized early lobed horn
« Reply #11 on: January 17, 2023, 04:23:51 PM »
Rich. 
Didnít mean to hijack your thread. And you made one of the points I was trying to make. Iíve only done this restoration on plain horns in the $100-$200 range to preserve them. A dated/scrimmed horn of significant more value is a different matter, and should probably have initials and date of a new endcap installation put on it by the artisan.  At a minimum inside - that can be clearly seen with a bore scope camera.  Similar to some restored rifles that are marked in barrel channels, etc.
 
So anyway, Iíll shut up now.  And in the words of Nathaniel from the LOM movieÖ.
this horn ďstays as it laysĒ.   👍😀

Offline rich pierce

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Re: Medium sized early lobed horn
« Reply #12 on: January 17, 2023, 05:07:38 PM »
No worries, Top Jaw! I think such discussions are good. I think ďrulesĒ or guidelines on restoration apply mostly to items with value and/or provenance.

When I was about 22 I bought a trade tomahawk head that was plowed up. It was $10 at a garage sale. Not cheap for me, then.  Itís from the 1650-1750 period. At some point it had been used as a wedge and the eye got mangled. The 3 local museums have examples. I could let it sit in the house somewhere, or restore and use it. Again, common trade tomahawk head, mangled eye, common style, but old and cool. What did my 22 year old self do? I forged that eye open, hafted it, and use it a lot. It throws well, looks great, and can administer the coup de grace to deer in a pinch.

I similarly found a full sized felling ax head from the 1700s, with a very nice steel bit. Its head had been mushroomed from getting bashed with a sledge. Itís my go-to splitting ax now, with the mushroom overlap hot-cut off in the forge and filed to de-bur it.

My standards may differ from many. But our personal collections will soon flood a market a little short of buyers.
Andover, Vermont