Author Topic: Flat Horn Repaired  (Read 886 times)

Offline JSMOSBY

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Flat Horn Repaired
« on: April 07, 2023, 12:22:04 AM »
I picked up this repaired flat horn at the Baltimore Antique Arms Show several weeks ago essentially for the repair and as a replacement for another flat horn I no longer have in my collection.  You can see the "repaired" crack adjacent to the bottom radius extending into the brass base cap collar.  The brass solder joint is slightly open at the joint between the collar and flat piece of the cap assembly.  The base cap is attached to the horn with three wood pins.  The charger, attached to the horn with three steel brads, is marked in increments of 65/60/55/50 was frozen in place.  I soaked it with Liquid Wrench penetrating oil for several days making sure I did not get any oil on the horn itself, only the charger.  With a lot of TLC it finally loosened and slides freely now.  I will not be using this piece although it would work just fine.  It is similar to Riling #1168-2.  There are no markings evident.  Enjoy.















« Last Edit: April 07, 2023, 01:16:16 AM by JSMOSBY »

Offline Dutch Blacky

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Re: Flat Horn Repaired
« Reply #1 on: April 07, 2023, 09:10:27 AM »
Really nice flat horn with a good patina.

Maybe a horn made on or for the continent in the second half of the  19th century? I was told that english flasks mostly have graduations in drams on the charger, chargers made on or for continental Europe got graduations in grains.

What do you think about it?

Offline JSMOSBY

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Re: Flat Horn Repaired
« Reply #2 on: April 07, 2023, 02:56:54 PM »
"Maybe a horn made on or for the continent in the second half of the 19th century? I was told that English flasks mostly have graduations in drams on the charger, chargers made on or for continental Europe got graduations in grains."

I agree with your comments then I reread Riling's description of the horn I referenced above, "The graduations on the charger are scaled from 85 to 100 grains...made for the best French trade."  Considering that there are no markings could it have been made for the American trade?  Riling's horn was made by Dixon.

I was once told that the green color of the horn was a result of a 19th century (or earlier) process to poison the horn with arsenic to kill insects and prevent decomposition if not properly cleaned for storage only prior to conversion to a horn or other.
« Last Edit: April 07, 2023, 03:02:16 PM by JSMOSBY »

Offline Dutch Blacky

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Re: Flat Horn Repaired
« Reply #3 on: April 07, 2023, 08:02:01 PM »
I remember an interesting discussion about green horns
https://americanlongrifles.org/forum/index.php?topic=11826.msg112862#msg112862

The green color as the result of a "process to poison the horn with arsenic to kill insects and prevent decomposition if not properly cleaned for storage only prior to conversion to a horn or other," is a new aspect to me.
Thanks

Offline mr. no gold

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Re: Flat Horn Repaired
« Reply #4 on: April 07, 2023, 11:02:08 PM »
Seems that York horns colored 'green' are the most highly prized ones. Could well be that the green color is an insect inhibitor. I had heard that this might be the case. Most such horns by now have most of the green color worn off as can be seen on one or two York's that I have. There are others however in some collections that have all of the color intact. Nice find JS, this horn. Thank you for bringing it by to be admired. Nice that the old cord is still present.
Dick