Author Topic: Wire Inlay  (Read 4375 times)

Offline Pukka Bundook

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Re: Wire Inlay
« Reply #50 on: December 14, 2023, 05:29:44 AM »
Jim Kibler,
I am a blacksmith compared to you and many others, but when I have done wire inlay, the method of putting the teeth on the lower edge as you describe  is the way I learned it.

I would use a dull knife and chop teeth in it lightly.  With that method there is no chance of the wire coming back out.

Offline Bob Gerard

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Re: Wire Inlay
« Reply #51 on: December 14, 2023, 05:52:25 AM »
I can imagine how lost on time the artist becomes doing this intricate work.
« Last Edit: December 14, 2023, 06:26:15 AM by Bob Gerard »

Offline Pukka Bundook

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Re: Wire Inlay
« Reply #52 on: December 14, 2023, 07:00:38 AM »
Bob,

I am still trying to imagine how it works, to jam multiple wires in the same cut, without it coughing its guts back out, so to speak.
Yes, I know this is how the silver is thickened, but my thought would have been to cut directly beside every few wires, rather than attempt to jam too many in the same cut.

Best.
R.

Offline HighUintas

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Re: Wire Inlay
« Reply #53 on: December 14, 2023, 10:11:12 AM »
Are there any recommended "how to" books on wire inlay?

Offline smart dog

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Re: Wire Inlay
« Reply #54 on: December 14, 2023, 03:17:20 PM »
"The main accomplishment of modern economics is to make astrology look good."

Offline rich pierce

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Re: Wire Inlay
« Reply #55 on: December 14, 2023, 03:43:49 PM »
Hi,
Yes.  David Price's little book on wire inlay. 
https://www.lulu.com/shop/david-price/david-price-silver-wire-tutorial/paperback/product-1jere6zw.html?page=1&pageSize=4

dave
Well, hed be one of the right people to write such a book! I get to see more of his work now that Im in New England and each piece is very fine.
Andover, Vermont

Offline Tim Crosby

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Offline Blacksmoke

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Re: Wire Inlay
« Reply #57 on: December 14, 2023, 05:53:11 PM »
Then , of course there are the short articles that I wrote for "Gunmaker" magazine which are available on this forum under "services and products"  Hugh Toenjes
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Offline axelp

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Re: Wire Inlay
« Reply #58 on: December 14, 2023, 06:29:51 PM »
I read in a post on another forum that a gent used epoxy to keep the wire in, but that seems like a potential mess to try and finish the wood afterwards.

Tasty "frosting" on that cake Mr. Pierce to be sure.

It's definitely a "high art." If I were to show up in a hunter's camp carrying a "gentleman's" gun of such quality, I would have been labeled a thief and strung up to a nearby tree.

Pretty though

K
Galations 2:20

Offline Mike Brooks

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Re: Wire Inlay
« Reply #59 on: December 14, 2023, 06:50:40 PM »
Here's one of the few makers I would rate as "Master". Mark Silver's Germanic rifle. I never got to handle it, but it looks spectacular in pictures. Mark really knows his way around wire work. And everything else for that matter!Some things that come to mind when I look at this gun. I don't believe it's a copy of any particular gun but rather built around a traditional school with his own traditional designed carving and wire patterns applied. He certainly didn't need to do a contemporary styled gun to display his design and execution skills.


« Last Edit: December 14, 2023, 07:11:54 PM by Mike Brooks »
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Say, any of you boys smithies? Or, if not smithies per se, were you otherwise trained in the metallurgic arts before straitened circumstances forced you into a life of aimless wanderin'?

Offline axelp

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Re: Wire Inlay
« Reply #60 on: December 14, 2023, 08:57:24 PM »
Tim thank you for the links. Outstanding work. The step by step helped a lot. Again, the thick and thin attributes of the work are just fabulous in both Mark Silver's and also in Acer's work. Wow.
Galations 2:20

Offline Jim Kibler

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Re: Wire Inlay
« Reply #61 on: December 15, 2023, 01:03:22 AM »
Mark Silver.




Offline Blacksmoke

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Re: Wire Inlay
« Reply #62 on: December 15, 2023, 01:23:59 AM »
Beautiful!!
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Offline Mike Brooks

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Re: Wire Inlay
« Reply #63 on: December 15, 2023, 01:47:50 AM »
That's the one I was looking for. Nothing has been built like that since the 1770s.
NEW WEBSITE! www.mikebrooksflintlocks.com
Say, any of you boys smithies? Or, if not smithies per se, were you otherwise trained in the metallurgic arts before straitened circumstances forced you into a life of aimless wanderin'?

Offline axelp

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Re: Wire Inlay
« Reply #64 on: December 15, 2023, 02:22:00 AM »
wow. yep.
Galations 2:20

Offline Blacksmoke

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Re: Wire Inlay
« Reply #65 on: December 15, 2023, 07:36:42 PM »
Thanks Mike: For posting photos of Mark Silver's wire work! Those are the same pictures that I use as examples when I teach wire inlay.  Also, I have with me the cased set that is posted on this forum under Contemporary Gun Collecting. Then the student can get up close and personal to see wire on a rifle stock.  Instead of on a flat surface.  When doing wire on a convex on concave surface one needs to do further treatment to the silver ribbon before it is lowered into the "stab in". The wire needs to be shaped to the curve of rounded section.  Also I do not use those small hacksaw blades for stabbing in. I find that your hand gets in the way blocking your vision which leads to the dreaded "elbows" in ones pattern. The final wire image will only be as good as the pattern drawn on the wood.  I fashion "stab in" tools from small screw drivers and chisel gouges.  It allows me to keep on the pattern lines a lot better.  As to the varying thickness of the wire I simply lay in additional sections of ribbon which are heavily tapered at each end.  Do not use epoxy to hold the ribbon in place. It will be too hard to remove all from the wood surface and there will be areas where the stain will not take. The same goes for "Crazy Glue".   Hugh Toenjes
« Last Edit: December 15, 2023, 07:43:42 PM by Blacksmoke »
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