Author Topic: Loading German Jager rifles-Period methods ?  (Read 3048 times)

Willy

  • Guest
Loading German Jager rifles-Period methods ?
« on: August 22, 2008, 11:27:24 PM »
  Hello,
     Has anybody seen any period documents or accounts of how 18th. and early 19th c. european hunters or military Feldjagers loaded their rifles?
                     Kind Thanks,
                          Will :)

Willy

  • Guest
Re: Loading German Jager rifles-Period methods ?
« Reply #1 on: August 24, 2008, 06:11:38 PM »
  Hello,
    I would also like to know if any folks have original tools,moulds,etc. for these rifles.I know there must be a few european rifle buffs out there.Care to share a pic or two?
                           Kind Thanks,
                                   Will :)

Offline Dphariss

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8642
  • Northern I Corps Kill a Commie for your Mommy
Re: Loading German Jager rifles-Period methods ?
« Reply #2 on: August 30, 2008, 09:21:36 PM »
  Hello,
     Has anybody seen any period documents or accounts of how 18th. and early 19th c. european hunters or military Feldjagers loaded their rifles?
                     Kind Thanks,
                          Will :)
By this time the patch and fairly loose fitting ball were the norm.  In the 17th century and perhaps after there are valid references to oversized balls, steel loading rods etc etc but this is problematical in proving actual or widespread use and can result in "discussions" here and elsewhere. Driving a oversized ball into a ML rifle is a really dumb way to load it from the practical standpoint.
The British "Baker" (adopted in 1800) used a patched ball for precision shooting that was still somewhat undersize. They used a smaller ball for rapid fire where accuracy was less important.
Bailey's book on British FL military rifles covers the ammo in detail.
Dan
No, sir, I don't give 'em $#*!, I just tell the truth and they think it's $#*!. Harry S Truman

Offline Elnathan

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1527
Re: Loading German Jager rifles-Period methods ?
« Reply #3 on: September 01, 2008, 05:42:31 PM »
In DeWitt Bailey's British Military Flintlock Rifles has a picture of a Hesse-Hanau Freicorps rifle, caliber .575, that has a 98.76 grain powder measure still in the box. The twist is one turn in 38.64". Hope that helps.
A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying...cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects. -Robert A. Heinlein