Author Topic: powder horn panels and rings  (Read 10354 times)

Offline Larry Pletcher

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powder horn panels and rings
« on: July 07, 2008, 09:48:44 PM »
The last couple of days I roughed out two powder horns that will have panels on the spout.  I am ready to work on the raised rings that will hold the strap.  I gave some thought to making a hemispherical scraper to shape the rings.  Maybe use the end of a hack saw blade - the hole in the end of the blade might be a start to shaping the scraper.   any ideas?

Regards,
Pletch
Regards,
Pletch
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chapmans

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Re: powder horn panels and rings
« Reply #1 on: July 07, 2008, 09:51:05 PM »
  Larry,
  I have a lathe! Or are you going to turn the rings in the horn?
 Steve
« Last Edit: July 07, 2008, 09:52:56 PM by chapmans »

Offline Larry Pletcher

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Re: powder horn panels and rings
« Reply #2 on: July 07, 2008, 10:35:42 PM »
  Larry,
  I have a lathe! Or are you going to turn the rings in the horn?
 Steve

Hey Steve,
Seems like we just talked.   :)The ring is on the horn one on either side of teh groove that holds the strap.  I can scrape one side at a time but thought maybe I could make a tool to speed things up.
Regards,
Pletch
blackpowdermag@gmail.com

He is no fool who gives up what he cannot keep to gain what can never be taken away.

Kayla Mueller - I didn't come here of my own accord, and I can't leave that way.  Whoever brought me here, will have to take me home.

Offline Tim Crosby

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Re: powder horn panels and rings
« Reply #3 on: July 07, 2008, 11:28:24 PM »
I am having trouble visualizing what you are doing. What am I missing?

Tim C.

Offline Dr. Tim-Boone

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Re: powder horn panels and rings
« Reply #4 on: July 07, 2008, 11:46:04 PM »
If you are cutting the raised rings on both sides of the groove for the strap.....???//  Files to a great job   ;) ;)

If thats not what you are doing...what the heck are you doing??
« Last Edit: July 07, 2008, 11:46:27 PM by DrTimBoone »
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ironwolf

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Re: powder horn panels and rings
« Reply #5 on: July 07, 2008, 11:48:56 PM »
Cut the outlines to near depth, then round off with a file after you've relieved the neck.   Very simple and fast as well.  And Larry, if you don't have the new "Sibley" book, the photo gallery alone is worth the price of addmission.

 Have Fun, Kevin

Black Hand

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Re: powder horn panels and rings
« Reply #6 on: July 08, 2008, 12:19:23 AM »
Horn doesn't much like being scraped against the grain, which is what you would be doing with your scraper.  A file will do the job very well with minimal hassle.   

Offline Larry Pletcher

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Re: powder horn panels and rings
« Reply #7 on: July 08, 2008, 01:15:43 AM »
It is the raised rings on either side of the strap groove.  I tried a little scrapper and found out what blackhand said is true.  It scraps much better with  the grain than against.   Two or three of you said files were better, and I agree.  I will probably take the panels down a little more to make the rings a little taller, but I'm getting close. 

 I have Scott's book and have found it very helpful.    He has many useful tips which have been a help.  I'd recommend it as a valuable source.  I also had a chance to photograph Lee Larkin's class a Conner Prairie some time back.  That was a great experience as well.  I spent as much time learning and taking pictures.

Regards,
Pletch
blackpowdermag@gmail.com

He is no fool who gives up what he cannot keep to gain what can never be taken away.

Kayla Mueller - I didn't come here of my own accord, and I can't leave that way.  Whoever brought me here, will have to take me home.

Offline T.C.Albert

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Re: powder horn panels and rings
« Reply #8 on: July 08, 2008, 01:58:26 AM »
Larry, I have to agree with the file advice...a nice sharp half round double cut (can I say it..."bastard file") will make short work of your shaping....then pros or cons aside, I smooth and final shape with broken window glass to shave out the file marks. Glass shards worked for Daniel Boone, and in my opinion is still is the best way to go for final finishing.
Just my two cents worth....
T.C.Albert 
« Last Edit: July 08, 2008, 01:59:40 AM by T.C.Albert »
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Offline Tim Crosby

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Re: powder horn panels and rings
« Reply #9 on: July 08, 2008, 01:58:58 AM »
If I am reading this right it would take four cuts, I use a hack saw. The center two being space how ever wide you want your strap the outer two
however wide you want your rings to be, Then taper back from the tip and the butt to the out side two cuts. I use rasps,files,scrapers, sand paper and steel wool, mostly in that order, If you take a 1/4 to 3/8 rasp and make the two outside edges safe you can use it to cut between your two center lines. Start it out at about a 45 degree angle. Then use it to start the taper on the out side cuts.
I hope this is helpful. Some things are easier done than said or written.

Tim C.  

 

 

Offline Tim Crosby

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Re: powder horn panels and rings
« Reply #10 on: July 08, 2008, 02:04:22 AM »
Larry, . Glass shards worked for Daniel Boone, and in my opinion is still is the best way to go for final finishing.
Just my two cents worth....
T.C.Albert 

Hey Tim I gotta agree. 50 years ago my Pap showed me how to scrape wood with broken glass, don't cut it just bust it, and it works great.

 Tim C.


 

Offline Dr. Tim-Boone

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Re: powder horn panels and rings
« Reply #11 on: July 08, 2008, 02:40:11 AM »
broken Mason jor or wine bottle is great. Refinihed my first old rifle at age 15 with glass my Dad showed me how to use. It is terriffic! 

That being said I have a nice little Buck huntinmg knife my son gave me a few years back ( modern so it doesn't fit my kit) it is reall sharp and I use it to scrape horns. It is really effective... I bet those guys sitting around in forts in the wildernness waiting for the redcoats to show up used their knives to make some of those neat horns with maps and fort plans on them. ;)
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Liberty is the only thing you cannot have unless you are willing to give it to others. – William Allen White

Learning is not compulsory...........neither is survival! - W. Edwards Deming

Offline Larry Pletcher

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Re: powder horn panels and rings
« Reply #12 on: July 08, 2008, 06:03:28 AM »
Thanks fellows.  I've been using a cabinet scrapper, but I hadn't thought about broken glass.
Regards,
Pletch
blackpowdermag@gmail.com

He is no fool who gives up what he cannot keep to gain what can never be taken away.

Kayla Mueller - I didn't come here of my own accord, and I can't leave that way.  Whoever brought me here, will have to take me home.

Offline Collector

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Re: powder horn panels and rings
« Reply #13 on: July 08, 2008, 06:50:35 AM »
I'm not an expert, but there's a tendency to always be taking just a 'bit' more off when working on the neck of the horn, especially in the 'top' of the curved portion.  Don't count on the horn being of a uniform thickness.  Place the horn against a bright light, periodically, to check for 'thin' areas.  You may not want it to have that 'period repaired' look until after you've actually had the opportunity to use it a few times.  Good Luck!!
 

Offline Dr. Tim-Boone

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Re: powder horn panels and rings
« Reply #14 on: July 08, 2008, 10:55:54 PM »
But remember, If you can' see the powder through the sides it ain't thin enough  ;) ;) ;) ;D
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Liberty is the only thing you cannot have unless you are willing to give it to others. – William Allen White

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ironwolf

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Re: powder horn panels and rings
« Reply #15 on: July 09, 2008, 02:13:34 AM »
Drop a tiny flash light into the horn, head first, of coarse.
KW

Offline T.C.Albert

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Re: powder horn panels and rings
« Reply #16 on: July 09, 2008, 05:25:37 AM »
I have exactly such a see through horn with a southern pouch listed now on the CLA "for sale" site. They are fun to make, and it is neat to see the powder level through them by holding them up the sun. Amber colored horns are perfect for this. Supposedly this was all the rage for awhile back in the early 1800s...and thats exactly the style of horn Daniel Boone was reputedly scraping on..
T.C.Albert
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Offline rick landes

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Re: powder horn panels and rings
« Reply #17 on: July 18, 2008, 05:51:20 PM »
I have a "Stanley" brand 1/4" wood chisel that I have polished the flat back on (like I do when starting to sharpen my good carving chisels) and the edges on each side of the back flat...making a nice 90 degree angle (more or less). The slightly tipped corners of these flats running the length of the chisel shaft makes smoothing out a horn flat or scraping a new horn to thickness a breeze :) and the handle is easy on the hands.

I use it somewhat like I might hold a small knife for whittlin'. Being able to tip the edge a bit I can somewhat adjust the aggressiveness of the cut or lift for an adjustment to the width of the cutting surface
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