Author Topic: Building an Ohio Style Halfstock - broken photos fixed!  (Read 34900 times)

Offline Curtis

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Building an Ohio Style Halfstock - broken photos fixed!
« on: January 11, 2018, 08:52:38 AM »
I have been meaning to get around to post a few pics of my latest project, and am finally getting around to it.  I prefer building a flinter, however this gun is for my son and will be his first muzzleloader and his deer rifle.  He requested a halfstock percussion rifle.  Fair enough if it gets him hooked on shooting black power guns!   ;)

I started sawing the stock a couple of weeks before Christmas...









A little cleanup with a framing chisel, then some leveling with a plane:





This was a fantastic chunk of wood as far as grain flow, density and figure, but was about a half inch too short for the project - So I stretched the stock a but by gluing on an extension, which will be under the nosecap when the rifle is completed.  The extension was glued on oversize and cut shorter later.  I dovetailed a nib in the center of the stock.  Not a true dovetail but not sure how to properly term it...





In-letting the barrel.  If your gouge is sharp and you go with the grain your cuts should be shiny.  If you look at the last pic in the series you can see how well the glue is holding, even after being shaved with the gouge!









When the barrel sides are close enough to the wood I scribe along the side of the barrel and stab in the lines with a chisel.  Then the channel is finished with chisels, gouges and scrapers.   I generally don't bent the tang until the barrel is pretty well in.





Barrel is in!  This barrel is tapered, 1" to 7/8" in .54.



Thanks for looking,
Curtis
« Last Edit: May 07, 2020, 08:03:15 AM by Curtis »
Curtis Allinson
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Sometimes, late at night when I am alone in the inner sanctum of my workshop and no one else can see, I sand things using only my fingers for backing

Offline Curtis

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Re: Building an Ohio Style Halfstock
« Reply #1 on: January 11, 2018, 09:20:12 AM »
I refine the profile of the stock near to what I think its finished dimensions should be, then start cutting the widths to size.  I like to use a larger gouge for quick material removal.





When I make a mistake, I like to show how I attempt to correct it.  Mistakes are great learning tools, especially when it's someone else's mistake!!  ;D  When I was sawing the width of the forestock, I got carried away with my saw and cut things way to narrow in one spot.  To fix it, I used some scrap from the cutoff wood adjacent to the boo-boo.  I filed the saw marks off and glued the patch in with even clamping pressure.  On the ends that butt together I drew on the wood with a brown Sharpie.  With careful selection of wood orientations, the patch will be virtually invisible when the rifle is stained and finished if your joints are good and tight.  I forgot to take a picture before I glued the patch in...  and yes, the scrap piece has the extension still glued to the end as you can see!







Inlet buttplate, starting to form the cheek, then drilling the ramrod hole:











Starting to shape the stock, designing sideplate.  I like to draw the sideplate directly on the rifle stock and make a tracing, then transfer the image to the metal.











Curtis
« Last Edit: May 07, 2020, 07:51:23 AM by Curtis »
Curtis Allinson
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Sometimes, late at night when I am alone in the inner sanctum of my workshop and no one else can see, I sand things using only my fingers for backing

Offline Curtis

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Re: Building an Ohio Style Halfstock
« Reply #2 on: January 11, 2018, 09:39:06 AM »
I wanted a German Silver side plate, but didn't have any GS thick enough - so I soldered a piece of 40 thou GS to some brass, cut the plate out with a hack saw and jeweler's saw, then finished with files.











Ramrod pipes were then rolled up using GS, then silver soldered a piece of brass and GS together for a two tone toeplate.  The brass piece was cut to match the GS and filed for a close fit before joining with silver solder.















Trimming end of toeplate, then ready to inlet:







That's it for now, thanks for looking!
Curtis
« Last Edit: May 07, 2020, 07:52:25 AM by Curtis »
Curtis Allinson
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Sometimes, late at night when I am alone in the inner sanctum of my workshop and no one else can see, I sand things using only my fingers for backing

Offline kentucky bucky

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Re: Building an Ohio Style Halfstock
« Reply #3 on: January 11, 2018, 09:50:35 AM »
Nice work! I'm getting the urge to start a Ohio style sporting rifle that I finally gathered all the parts for.

n stephenson

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Re: Building an Ohio Style Halfstock
« Reply #4 on: January 11, 2018, 03:54:34 PM »
Curtis, I always like your posts. Son should cherish that rifle a long time, grandkids too. Nice work! Nate

Offline Tim Crosby

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Re: Building an Ohio Style Halfstock
« Reply #5 on: January 11, 2018, 04:14:13 PM »
 Great series & Pix, I like the way you use the clamps when drilling the RR hole, especially the modification to the one closest to the hole.

  Tim
« Last Edit: January 11, 2018, 10:46:11 PM by Tim Crosby »

Offline KC

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Re: Building an Ohio Style Halfstock
« Reply #6 on: January 11, 2018, 05:51:24 PM »
I'm looking forward to following this. I have an old Ohio percussion muzzleloader that my Dad had around the house for over 40 years until he passed away. Now I have it and had Jack Brooks do some work on it. I've wanted to post pictures on this site to see if anyone could help me ID the maker or provide any insight but I haven't done it yet.

I'm anxious to see how this one comes out, so far it's looking reallly nice.
K.C. Clem
Bradenton, FL

Offline smallpatch

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Re: Building an Ohio Style Halfstock
« Reply #7 on: January 11, 2018, 09:15:20 PM »
Nicely done Curtis.  You've shown the Newbies that a lot of problems, and/or mistakes can be repaired or hidden with a little ingenuity.
BUT, dang dude, you need a bandsaw.
Again, nice job.
In His grip,

Dane

Offline Curtis

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Re: Building an Ohio Style Halfstock
« Reply #8 on: January 12, 2018, 05:25:30 AM »
Thanks for your comments guys!  Tim, I learned how to modify the clam you mentioned in one of Jack Brooks classes at the NMLRA gusnsmithing seminar, it has proved to be quite useful.  It is hard to tell from the photos but in addition to the plethora of clamps I taped some spacers on the barrel to help keep the drill level and also employed a couple of velcro loops.  A wondering ramrod drill can be a disastrous thing... yup, that is the voice of experience!

Smallpatch - a bandsaw would speed things up a bit, but believe it or not the last time I used a bandsaw I removed too much wood then also.  Just faster, lol!  And yes, a mistake just creates an opportunity to get creative and figure out how to get past the issue.

Curtis
« Last Edit: January 17, 2018, 10:14:44 AM by Curtis »
Curtis Allinson
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Sometimes, late at night when I am alone in the inner sanctum of my workshop and no one else can see, I sand things using only my fingers for backing

JVavrek

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Re: Building an Ohio Style Halfstock
« Reply #9 on: January 12, 2018, 06:12:21 AM »
Curtis, thanks for posting this build. Can't wait to start on my first build. Watching you guys just gets me that much more fired up about getting it going. Great job and keep us posted.

Offline Elnathan

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Re: Building an Ohio Style Halfstock
« Reply #10 on: January 12, 2018, 06:46:33 AM »
That looks like an old felloe saw. How well does it work? I've got a 28" rip blade for a bow-saw that I've always intended to make into a saw like that, but never got around to doing it. I don't have a bandsaw and probably won't ever have one, so it seems like a good substitute.
A man can never have too much red wine, too many books, or too much ammunition -  Rudyard Kipling

Offline Pukka Bundook

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Re: Building an Ohio Style Halfstock
« Reply #11 on: January 12, 2018, 07:27:25 AM »
V Good job, Curtis!

You had me worried running that gouge in the barrel channel without stabbing in first though!   ;)

Offline Curtis

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Re: Building an Ohio Style Halfstock
« Reply #12 on: January 12, 2018, 07:44:40 AM »
JVarek, glad to hear it!  The main reason I post this stuff is to help out and/or get fired up the new builders!

Elnathan, the felloe saw works pretty well.  I was seriously contemplating making one myself until I found this one at a swap meet for eighteen bucks!

Pukka, just living on the edge ya know!  Sometimes I stab in a bit narrower than the barrel until I can get the bottom three flats down, then go full width.  This wood was well behaved and not "chippy" if I gouged in the right direction so I wasn't too worried about having a runner bust out of my channel width.

Curtis
Curtis Allinson
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Sometimes, late at night when I am alone in the inner sanctum of my workshop and no one else can see, I sand things using only my fingers for backing

Offline Curtis

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Re: Building an Ohio Style Halfstock
« Reply #13 on: January 12, 2018, 08:43:31 AM »
I spent some time today making a muzzle cap for the rifle.  I wanted to create a cap with an angled front that is featured on many halfstocks... I'm sure that style of cap has a name however if so it has eluded me.  :( 

The past couple of rifles I have built I stabbed in the back of the recess with a chisel instead of using a saw, treating it like an inlet.  Got help from a bit of masking tape as a guide to help keep my lines straight, then employed a rasp and a file to remove the remaining wood under the cap area.



I normally use the rifle stock to shape and form the muzzlecap, however since this style of cap will require some serious hammering I decided to mock up a solid model of the rifle forend.



...and then filed the appropriate flats on the face of the model.



Next comes forming the cap:







Now for the final fitting process...  I filed my angled flats on the nose of the stock and started working the cap into place.





I made a couple of simple accessories a few guns back that help with forming the cap and prevent splitting the stock.  One is made from scrap oak and the other a ramrod cutoff.  The pictures are self explanatory.  I then employ some "Dickert approved" hose clamps to draw the cap metal down tight around the stock.











After I get the shape I am looking for I float the faces on a file to true things up so one side mates nicely with the wood and the other is ready for soldering. 



This side still needs work:



Next I set up for silver soldering.  I just recently learned a simple trick from an accomplished builder and friend, Hank Elwood.  Hank in turn learned it from Joe Valentine in a class at WKU.  The simple trick is to heat the flux until the water boils off before you position the solder on the work - this keeps the solder from moving away from the joint before it melts.

First I cut a piece of german silver to fit the cap.  For the setup I "clamped" the work in place with the weight of a section or RR spike, boiled off the water in the flux, placed the solder where it would flow out the joint and then applied the heat.  In the last couple of pics you can see the solder really flowed well.















Cut off the excess metal, then do the final fitting and cleanup:









Mark the inside for the barrel cutout, then make room for that barrel!  It doesn't show well but I marked inside the barrel channel with a blue sharpie then with a scribe.







A little filing on the top of the cap to bring it level with the stock and it is ready to rivet in place!  Well, gotta clean up that face a bit also...

That's all for now, and thanks for looking!  :)
Curtis
« Last Edit: May 07, 2020, 07:53:54 AM by Curtis »
Curtis Allinson
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Sometimes, late at night when I am alone in the inner sanctum of my workshop and no one else can see, I sand things using only my fingers for backing

Offline dogcreek

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Re: Building an Ohio Style Halfstock
« Reply #14 on: January 13, 2018, 01:10:31 AM »
I can tell that rifle is a labor of love. Thank you for posting all the great progress pictures.

Offline SingleMalt

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Re: Building an Ohio Style Halfstock
« Reply #15 on: January 13, 2018, 01:45:31 AM »
That's a nice bit of work, Curtis.
Never drink whisky that isn't old enough to vote.

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Offline elk killer

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Re: Building an Ohio Style Halfstock
« Reply #16 on: January 13, 2018, 02:10:57 AM »
Curtis, I always admire and appreciate  you showing how it's done
never to late to learn something different 
only flintlocks remain interesting..

Offline Curtis

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Re: Building an Ohio Style Halfstock
« Reply #17 on: January 13, 2018, 05:50:37 AM »
Thanks guys! Elk Killer, I learn so much here so it makes me want to share ideas back.  The same processes may not work for everyone, but sometimes seeing a different method of doing things can set a guy to thinkin', and you never know where that can lead!

Curtis
Curtis Allinson
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Sometimes, late at night when I am alone in the inner sanctum of my workshop and no one else can see, I sand things using only my fingers for backing

Offline Daryl

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Re: Building an Ohio Style Halfstock
« Reply #18 on: January 13, 2018, 07:51:55 PM »
Nice to see well done silver soldering.
Daryl

"a gun without hammers is like a spaniel without ears" King George V

Hemo

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Re: Building an Ohio Style Halfstock
« Reply #19 on: January 13, 2018, 08:02:16 PM »
Too much to comment on here, Curtis, I like it all!
Where did you find the brown Sharpie for wood repair?
The felloe saw is very cool and undoubtedly saves on the electric bill created by a band saw, but I think I'll stick by my old band saw as long as it keeps turning.
Looking forward to more!

Gregg

Offline Curtis

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Re: Building an Ohio Style Halfstock
« Reply #20 on: January 15, 2018, 07:40:32 AM »
Thanks Daryl and Gregg.  Gregg, the brown Sharpie is simply that, a brown Sharpie that can be purchased at hobby lobby, wally world, or an office supply store.  It just served to darken the edges with a brownish color, was handy and dries almost instantly.

Curtis
Curtis Allinson
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Sometimes, late at night when I am alone in the inner sanctum of my workshop and no one else can see, I sand things using only my fingers for backing

Offline David Rase

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Re: Building an Ohio Style Halfstock
« Reply #21 on: January 15, 2018, 06:16:34 PM »
Curtis,
Nice job on  the muzzle cap.  It looks like it turned out great!  I originally wanted to post some kind of smart-alecky remark about you and your ever present rail road spike but could not come up with any thing clever.  Totally enjoying your thread.
David

Offline Curtis

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Re: Building an Ohio Style Halfstock
« Reply #22 on: January 17, 2018, 08:01:51 AM »
Thanks Dave! That means a lot coming from you, I have seen you makes some really nice caps.

On the other hand, consarn it, I like railroad spikes, they have a thousand and one uses!  They are always getting a bad rap for being dense, hard headed, rough around the edges and are often accused of being dull!!  Even though I used the one depicted above as dead weight, it rose to the occasion nicely and laid there the whole time I was soldering, with nary a complaint.   ;D 8) ;D

Now getting off my soapbox, lol!

Curtis
Curtis Allinson
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Sometimes, late at night when I am alone in the inner sanctum of my workshop and no one else can see, I sand things using only my fingers for backing

Offline Curtis

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Re: Building an Ohio Style Halfstock
« Reply #23 on: January 17, 2018, 09:25:44 AM »
Here are some pics of the muzzle cap with the barrel in place:







Got the toeplate inlet, sideplate and TG as well:







Getting started making the barrel key escutcheon inlays, and working on some ideas on yellow "sticky notes":









Thanks for looking,

Curtis "RR Spike" A.    ::)
« Last Edit: May 07, 2020, 07:54:57 AM by Curtis »
Curtis Allinson
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Sometimes, late at night when I am alone in the inner sanctum of my workshop and no one else can see, I sand things using only my fingers for backing

Offline Joe S.

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Re: Building an Ohio Style Halfstock
« Reply #24 on: January 17, 2018, 03:06:45 PM »
What wonderful how to thread Curtis,watching you fix a couple oops along the way is gold for new builders.Its one thing to be told how to but to see pictures along with it really helps.A real nice rifle in the making,thanks!
« Last Edit: January 17, 2018, 03:08:28 PM by Joe S. »