Author Topic: Hammer stall question  (Read 4828 times)

Offline Mike from OK

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Re: Hammer stall question
« Reply #25 on: March 28, 2020, 01:03:52 AM »
As to not needing one if your lock works fine, they all work fine until they don't.

Yep. I didn't take hunter safety until I was an adult... I didn't have to because of military service but I didn't like having to carry a copy of my DD214 with me. So I went and sat through the class with all the kids. One thing they hammered over and over was to not rely on a mechanical safety.

Chances are you could go your entire life and never have an issue. But a stall is cheap insurance against an unintended discharge.

Now that I have hopped up on the soapbox I guess I'll practice what I'm preaching and go make a few for my guns.

I might even try my hand at the style chubby mentioned.

Mike

Offline Daryl

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Re: Hammer stall question
« Reply #26 on: March 28, 2020, 03:09:24 AM »
It's safer yet if you don't go out. 
The first rule of safety is "don't point
the gun at anything you do not want to shoot".
Thus, 1/2 cock position works fine, for me.
Daryl

"a gun without hammers is like a spaniel without ears" King George V

Offline Mike from OK

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Re: Hammer stall question
« Reply #27 on: March 28, 2020, 03:31:59 AM »
It's safer yet if you don't go out. 
The first rule of safety is "don't point
the gun at anything you do not want to shoot".
Thus, 1/2 cock position works fine, for me.

Yes, muzzle discipline is key. However if you take a spill over a root or slip on some muddy or uneven terrain can you guarantee that you will keep absolute control over where your muzzle winds up pointing and that you won't jar the cock hard enough to strip it out of half cock?

Mike

Offline Daryl

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Re: Hammer stall question
« Reply #28 on: March 28, 2020, 09:19:16 AM »
Absolutely guarantee muzzle control and so would anyone else with military training.  Always pointed down range.
Down range is any direction in which there are no people.
Can I trust anyone else? - probably not & that is why all my hunting clients carry empty guns. Mine is the only one loaded
& I am in front.
Daryl

"a gun without hammers is like a spaniel without ears" King George V

Offline bob in the woods

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Re: Hammer stall question
« Reply #29 on: March 28, 2020, 11:02:12 PM »
Daryl, some of the historical reenactments mandate the use of a hammer stall.  Much like the non historically correct vent / flash guards also mandated.  I don't normally use these other than when required .   As you say, anyone behind me doesn't have a loaded weapon, this a product of my firearms training / acquisition certificate some 45 years ago, and personal rules of self preservation  ;D

Offline Bob McBride

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Re: Hammer stall question
« Reply #30 on: March 29, 2020, 01:20:54 AM »
Absolutely guarantee muzzle control and so would anyone else with military training.  Always pointed down range.
Down range is any direction in which there are no people.
Can I trust anyone else? - probably not & that is why all my hunting clients carry empty guns. Mine is the only one loaded
& I am in front.

The only time I remember from the military when there was no people down range, was at the range.

Offline BJH

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Re: Hammer stall question
« Reply #31 on: March 29, 2020, 03:27:19 AM »
Iím definitely a belt and suspenders type of guy. All my hunting flintlocks have hammer stalls. Mine fit snugly so casual contact will not dislodge them. Only a deliberate flip of the finger will remove them. I am one of the hunter ed instructors that stress that a half cock is not a reliable safety. And since a mechanical safety is made by man, it is not to be trusted fully any how. Only muzzle control, and a open action is trust worthy in my mind. During some testing I did myself I had about a 1 in 5 chance of a flintlock fireing the factory made rifle I tested. No priming. I dare say one of our custom locks are likely to do better. And yes Iím the same guy that posts conservative load data on our board.  ;)
BJH

Offline Daryl

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Re: Hammer stall question
« Reply #32 on: March 29, 2020, 03:48:50 AM »
Interesting - 1 in 5 you say. Not with my flinters, yet they all fire without hesitation when primed.
& yes, I am the one who says you should work up a load for all of your guns, starting low. ;)
A load that produces only 1,300fps to 1,400fps is a very mild load and one that will not give you
the best accuracy at 50yards and beyond, but it is a good place to start.
That's about 75 to 80gr. 2F in a .50.
« Last Edit: March 29, 2020, 03:54:32 AM by Daryl »
Daryl

"a gun without hammers is like a spaniel without ears" King George V

Offline WadePatton

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Re: Hammer stall question
« Reply #33 on: March 29, 2020, 04:39:56 AM »
Interesting. I have never used a hammer stall, nor have I ever observed anyone else using one.

I only seed 'em on this innernets.  ;D

and in a book once.  I guess Bob will have to show me one in person next time I'm out his way.

But no disrespect to those who do/are/shall use them. I learn from everybody. ;)

---
As far as safety goes, I plug the touchhole and dump the pan when I want best safety with a loaded gun (indoors or in vehicle). The muzzle is controlled to not point at non-targets as much as attentively practical, always. 

I've been around more than one AD and had one of my very own and they are no joke. I don't take safety lightly, and I don't run with those who do. I follow range/event rules if in those situations.


« Last Edit: March 29, 2020, 04:51:25 AM by WadePatton »
Hold to the Wind

Offline bob in the woods

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Re: Hammer stall question
« Reply #34 on: March 29, 2020, 06:48:27 AM »
I have been known to run with scissors in hand a time or two  ;D   Although safety isn't a joking matter, I think we all have to come to terms with what works for us. A hammer stall in use when hunting would be a liability for me in most situations. Especially when partridge hunting. 

Offline Bob McBride

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Re: Hammer stall question
« Reply #35 on: March 29, 2020, 06:25:03 PM »
Interesting. I have never used a hammer stall, nor have I ever observed anyone else using one.

I only seed 'em on this innernets.  ;D

and in a book once.  I guess Bob will have to show me one in person next time I'm out his way.

But no disrespect to those who do/are/shall use them. I learn from everybody. ;)

---
As far as safety goes, I plug the touchhole and dump the pan when I want best safety with a loaded gun (indoors or in vehicle). The muzzle is controlled to not point at non-targets as much as attentively practical, always. 

I've been around more than one AD and had one of my very own and they are no joke. I don't take safety lightly, and I don't run with those who do. I follow range/event rules if in those situations.

I have a few. I mainly use them on the deer gun and the fowling piece as thatís when itís most likely to be a wet day hunting and Iíll be ripping through briars. I never miss a morning deer hunting if itís pouring and has been all night and itís due to clear up by 7-8am. Good hunting. Many folks have never had a flintlock out in that weather. Iíve been out in it like that 100 times or more. If they had, even with a great waterproof pan thatís been waxed, you need something more, and keeping it under your cloak is great for reenacting but not a practical way to keep things dry in the thick wet woods. Thatís when I use a long knee. Misty and damp might just get a stall to keep the frizzen dry. As to safety, Iím glad to have either one on the gun in those situations but Iíve never snagged anything that caused an inadvertent discharge. Even in the thickest brush Iím too careful for that.

Ive had one inadvertent discharge myself. All my 3-gun firearms have Geissele triggers on them that all are in the 1-2 pound range with virtually zero slack, wall, overtravel, or reset. They are quite dangerous if youíve never used them before. No one touches those guns but me.

Offline Hungry Horse

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Re: Hammer stall question
« Reply #36 on: March 29, 2020, 07:12:47 PM »
After spending about forty five years shooting, and hunting, with muzzleloaders I have come to appreciate simplicity. Now when I encounter another shooter with a big old shooting bag full of ďwhat ifĒ gadgets, and a strap full as well, oh, and a few more attached to his gun, I run like my hairs on fire.

  Hungry Horse

Offline Craig Wilcox

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Re: Hammer stall question
« Reply #37 on: March 29, 2020, 08:08:19 PM »
The Marines at our base on Manila Bay, Philippines, taught me range safety and care of weapons at the age of 11.  Long, long ago - and those practices have stuck with me.

I'm with Bob McBride, and rarely use a hammer stall.  I have used a cow's knee a time or two - Florida was known for it's heavy rains.

Mostly, when getting into thick brush - or climbing/descending actions - I empty the pan and stick a feather or twig in the touchhole.  Just good common sense - but ya STILL keep it pointed downrange!
Craig Wilcox
We are all elated when Dame Fortune smiles at us, but remember that she is always closely followed by her daughter, Miss Fortune.

Offline Daryl

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Re: Hammer stall question
« Reply #38 on: March 30, 2020, 10:11:57 PM »
Exactly.
Daryl

"a gun without hammers is like a spaniel without ears" King George V

Offline smylee grouch

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Re: Hammer stall question
« Reply #39 on: March 30, 2020, 10:33:15 PM »
Well I have a hammer stall but can,t remember ever using it when hunting. I had it on once when I crossed the border and the border guy seen it and when I told him what it was he said thanks for being safe. I took it off when I got to bear camp though as it always seemed to snag on stuff going through the brush. Maybe I will have to consult with my adviser to see what I,m doing wrong.  ;D

chubby

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Re: Hammer stall question
« Reply #40 on: March 30, 2020, 10:49:16 PM »
Hi guys, been busy for a short while. don't have a photo but I make them by cutting a piece of leather 1 1/4 wide by 4 then fold over one end by 1 inch sew up both sides! then slide over the flint on safe notch put long tab up and pull over the flint screw and mark a dot at top of screw then cut a slit at the dot leave tab as long as you want!! for pulling of when needed. I put one on  each gun I build for someone. sorry it took a while for me to catch up :) :) Chubby