Author Topic: The Moll-Newhard-Kuntz Triangle of Old Northampton County Gunmaking  (Read 69035 times)

Online Eric Kettenburg

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Re: The Moll-Newhard-Kuntz Triangle of Old Northampton County Gunmaking
« Reply #50 on: May 07, 2012, 05:24:27 PM »
(8.)  A son of George Minier goes into the house to get a gun; Philip Buffart also has gun.

Collection: The Pennsylvania Gazette
Publication: The Pennsylvania Gazette
Date: March 11, 1756
Title: PHILADELPHIA, March 11.
PHILADELPHIA, March 11.

The following Account of Mischief done by the Indians at the Plantation of Philip Buffart, in Northampton County , on the other Side of the Blue Mountains, between Fort Norris and Fort Hamilton, was sent in a Letter from Mr. J. Matthew Otto to a Gentleman at Bethlehem, dated March 5. viz. That on the First Instant one Muhlhaus, who was breaking Flax there, was shot through the Body, and the Wound thought to be mortal: That a Boy of George Minierwas standing at the Door, and received a Shot in the Breast, upon which he went into the House to get his Gun, and as he was cocking it fell down dead: That then BuffartSon ran out of the House, when he was shot in several Places, and died soon after: That Buffart himself, and an Indian, fired at one another, when he was wounded in the Arm, and the Indian shot in the Back, who ran off, making an howling Noise: And that some of BuffartNeighbours, who came to his Assistance, heard a Groaning at a Distance, thought to be that of two wounded Indians; that they say five Indians; and that in the Beginning there were eight of them seen.
« Last Edit: May 07, 2012, 05:24:54 PM by Eric Kettenburg »
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Re: The Moll-Newhard-Kuntz Triangle of Old Northampton County Gunmaking
« Reply #51 on: May 07, 2012, 05:26:57 PM »
(9.)  Some folks up in Lynn township (NH Co.) get a group together and go after some natives, not very specific but they did fire upon the indians so at least some of them must have been armed.


Collection: The Pennsylvania Gazette
Publication: The Pennsylvania Gazette
Date: July 14, 1757
Title: PHILADELPHIA, July 14.
PHILADELPHIA, July 14.

We have Advice from Northampton County , that Teedyuscung is arrived at Easton, with 130 Indians, in order to hold a Conference with this Government.

And we hear from Lynn Township in the same County , that on the 9th Instant, as one Adam Clawse, with some of his Neighbours, were cutting down his Corn, they were attacked by a party of Indians: That of their Number two Men, two Women, and a Girl, escaped: That Martin Yager and his Wife were killed and scalped: That the Wife of John Crowshore, and one Child, the Wife of Abraham Secler, and one of Philip Ashton, were murdered, but not scalped: That upon the Alarm being given, a small Party went out after the Enemy, and came up with nine of them, at whom they fired some Shot, and it is thought wounded several; but that they afterwards lost them among the thick Woods.
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Re: The Moll-Newhard-Kuntz Triangle of Old Northampton County Gunmaking
« Reply #52 on: May 07, 2012, 05:34:37 PM »
(10.)  Again, here we have what seem to be men working in the fields, attacked suddenly.  At least a 14 year old boy has a "piece."

Collection: The Pennsylvania Gazette
Publication: The Pennsylvania Gazette
Date: June 29, 1758
Title: PHILADELPHIA, June 29.

From Northampton County we hear, that on Wednesday, the 14th Instant, two Men in a Field were fired at by the Enemy, one of which was wounded; that they took to the River, when the well Man escaped by swimming, but the wounded One was tomahawked in the River: That the same Day some People were fired on in another Field, and two Men killed; and a white Boy, about fourteen Years of Age, firing his Piece, wounded one of the Indians, and charged again, but finding his Companions had left him, made the best of his Way off.
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Re: The Moll-Newhard-Kuntz Triangle of Old Northampton County Gunmaking
« Reply #53 on: May 07, 2012, 05:41:56 PM »
(11.)  And of course, 1763. 

Collection: The Pennsylvania Gazette
Publication: The Pennsylvania Gazette
Date: October 13, 1763
Title: PHILADELPHIA, October 13.
PHILADELPHIA, October 13.

Wetterholt's militia party (number not mentioned) out of Fort Allen is attacked while unprepared at a private residence:


On Sunday Night last an Express arrived from Northampton County , with the following melancholy Account, viz. "That on the Morning before the House of John Stinton, about eight Miles from Bethlehem, was attacked by the Indians as follows. Captain Wetherholt, with a Party, belonging to Fort Allen, being at that House, and intending early for the Fort, ordered a Servant out to get his Horse ready, who was immediately shot down by the Enemy; upon which the Captain going to the Door, was also fired at, and mortally wounded: That then a Serjeant attempted to pull in the Captain; and to shut the Door, but he was likewise dangerously wounded: That the Lieutenant next advanced, when an Indian jumped upon the Bodies of the two others, and presented a Pistol to his Breast, which he put a little aside, and it went off over his Shoulder, whereby he got the Indian out of the House, and shut the Door: That the Indians after this went round to a Window, and as Stinton was getting out of Bed, shot him, but not dead, and he breaking out of the House, ran about a MIle, where he dropt and died: That his Wife, and 2 Children, ran down into the Cellar, where they were shot at three Times, but escaped: That Captain Wetherholt, finding himself growing very weak, crawled to a Window, and shot an Indian dead, it was thought, as he was setting Fire to the House with a Match: And that upon this the other Indians carried him away with them, and went off. Captain Wetherholt died soon after."

Here at Adam Tashler's were "...about 20 men in arms..."

Extract of a Letter from Bethlehem, October 9.

"Early this Morning came Nicholas Marks, of Whitehall Township, and brought the following Account, viz. That Yesterday, just after Dinner, as he opened his Door, he saw an Indian standing about two Poles from the House, who endeavoured to shoot at him; but Marks shutting the Door immediately, the Fellow slipt into a Cellar, close by the House. After this said Marks went out of the House, with his Wife, and an Apprentice Boy, in order to make their Escape, and saw another Indian standing behind a Tree, who also tried to shoot at them, but his Gun missed Fire. They then saw a third Indian running through the Orchard; upon which they made the best of their Way, about two Miles off, to one Adam Tashler, where about 20 Men in Arms were assembled, who went first to the House of Jacob Mekly, where they found a Boy and Girl lying dead, and the Girl scalped. From thence they went to Hance Sneider, and said MarkPlantations, and found both the Houses on Fire, and a Horse tied to the Bushes. They also found said Sneider, his Wife and three Children, dead in the Field, the Man and Woman scalped, but not the Children. On going further, they found three Girls, one dead, the other two wounded, one of which scalped. After this they returned, with the two wounded Girls, to Adam Tashlerand saw a Woman, Jacob AllmongWife, with a Child, lying dead in the Road, and scalped. The Number of the Indians, they think, was between Fifteen and Twenty.

"I cannot describe the deplorable Condition this poor Country is in; most of the Inhabitants of AllenTown, and other Places, are fled from their Habitations. Many are in Bethlehem, and other Places of the Brethren, and others farther down the Country. I cannot ascertain the Number killed, but think it exceeds Twenty. The People at Nazareth, and other Places belonging to the Brethren, have put themselves in the best Posture of Defence they can; they keep a strong Watch every Night, and hope, by the Blessing of God, if they are attacked, to make a good Stand."
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Online Eric Kettenburg

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Re: The Moll-Newhard-Kuntz Triangle of Old Northampton County Gunmaking
« Reply #54 on: May 07, 2012, 05:44:07 PM »
(Lost track of numbering!  Another account of Wetterholt's situation noted above; Andrew Hazlet's house attacked and Hazlet has a gun and - you guessed it - it misfires.)

Collection: The Pennsylvania Gazette
Publication: The Pennsylvania Gazette
Date: November 10, 1763
Title: PHILADELPHIA, November 10.

We are desired to publish what follows, as being a more authentic Account of the Damage done by the Indians in Northampton County , on the Eighth of last Month, than what was inserted in the Gazette of the 13th, viz.

"That on the 8th of October, betwixt Day break and Sunrise, the Indians attacked the House of John Stenton, when eight Persons (instead of three mentioned) were killed and wounded, seven of which were shot, some dead, and others died soon after of their Wounds, in the greatest Agony; the Eighth likely to do well: That after they went from Stenton, they plundered the House of James Allen, a little Way from thence; they then attacked the House of Andrew Hazlet, about Half a Mile from said Allen, where they shot one Man dead, and scalped him; upon which Hazlet got his Gun, and attempted to fire at the Enemy, but it missing Fire, he was shot himself by them; whereupon his Wife, being at some Distance, and seeing what had happened, ran off with two of her Children, but was instantly pursued by the Indians, who overtook and tomahawked her, and them, in a most barbarous Manner; notwithstanding which, she and one of the Children lived four Days in the most exquisite Pain, and the other Child it is thought will recover; after which they plundered HazletHouse: and that about a Quarter of a MileDistance from thence, they, as was supposed, plundered the House of one Crocher, and then burnt it down."
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Online Eric Kettenburg

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Re: The Moll-Newhard-Kuntz Triangle of Old Northampton County Gunmaking
« Reply #55 on: May 07, 2012, 05:46:33 PM »
John McNair in Allen township has a gun stolen from his house.


Collection: The Pennsylvania Gazette
Publication: The Pennsylvania Gazette
Date: September 3, 1767
Title: WENT away on the 19th of August, from the subscriber, living
WENT away on the 19th of August, from the subscriber, living in Allentownship, Northampton county, a man that proffessed to be a well digger, who agreed with me to dig a well, and accordingly began the same; but finding my house without any body in it, went in, and stole the following goods, viz. two good coats, two shirts, a neat fuzeen gun , shot bag, and powder horn; one coat is dark blue, home made thick cloth, full trimmed, the other is a brown watered stuff coat, full trimmed; the shirts are both coarse linen, one quite new, the other half worn, the shot bag is calfskin, dressed with the hair on, and a quantity of powder and shot. There was also stole the night following out of a house in the neigbourhood, supposed to be by the same person, a 40s. beaver hat, and a pair of channelled pumps. He told me his name was Archibald McCapel, born in Ireland, can speak good English and broken Dutch, is about 5 feet 6 inches high, sandy complexion, spitted with the small pox, had long black hair, but talked of cutting it off. Had on, when he went away, an old felt hat, check shirt, a short green thick cloth jacket, double breasted, with metal buttons, lined with white flannel, and striped linen trowsers, and old shoes, one with a buckle to it, the other tied. Whoever takes up and secures said thief, shall have THREE POUNDS reward, and reasonable charges, paid by me

JOHN McNAIR.
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Re: The Moll-Newhard-Kuntz Triangle of Old Northampton County Gunmaking
« Reply #56 on: May 07, 2012, 05:47:23 PM »
Guy runs off with a smooth rifle gun in Forks township.

Collection: The Pennsylvania Gazette
Publication: The Pennsylvania Gazette
Date: January 26, 1769
Title: RUN away from his bail, on the 9th of this inst. January, JOHN
RUN away from his bail, on the 9th of this inst. January, JOHN DAVIS, this country born, about 21 years of age, about 5 feet 5 inches high, of a sandy complexion, freckled, had a pretty large scar on the instep of one of his feet, occasioned by the cut of an ax, and he is pretty talkative; had on, when he went away, a blue broadcloth coat, with mohair buttons, a red plush waistcoat, leather breeches, and a fine hat; he also had other clothes, of a light ash colour, lined with striped linsey, the coat had no lining in the sleeves; these he had packed up in a pair of check trowsers; he may dispose of one suit; he took with him a smooth rifle gun , and as he has served his time, he may possibly produce his indenture. Whoever secures the said runaway in any goal, shall have FIVE POUNDS reward, paid by the subscriber in Forks township, Northampton county. GEORGE TIDFORD.
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Re: The Moll-Newhard-Kuntz Triangle of Old Northampton County Gunmaking
« Reply #57 on: May 07, 2012, 05:48:02 PM »
I'll see what else I can find.

Obviously they were not bristling with firearms, and many of these folks seem to have lots of problems with their firearms, but the firearms are there nevertheless.

The PRIMARY information is there, all one has to do is look for it.
« Last Edit: May 07, 2012, 05:52:42 PM by Eric Kettenburg »
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Offline spgordon

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Re: The Moll-Newhard-Kuntz Triangle of Old Northampton County Gunmaking
« Reply #58 on: May 07, 2012, 06:13:18 PM »
It would be interesting to know how Bob would respond to all this evidence of guns among Northampton County farmers--and, at least from what one can tell from many of the farmers' names, German farmers in Northampton County.

It is difficult to imagine--after seeing such evidence from the Pennsylvania Gazette, or realizing that if Northampton County's farmers were disarmed they must have possessed arms--how one could preserve the mistaken belief that there was not a market for guns among Northampton County's German farmers: guns were available and these farmers were able to obtain them.

It would be tricky to draw firm conclusions about the percentage of farmers overall that possessed arms from this information. But that would be an entirely different discussion. There's no evidence whatsoever that arms weren't available or that farmers couldn't (or didn't choose to) obtain them.

Burd's comment about Allentown in 1763 is interesting but only interesting in the way Bob thinks when taken out of context. Put back in the context that Eric has just supplied, the interesting question is why there weren't more guns in Allentown at that particular moment? Obviously there were plenty of guns available and those who lived in the surrounding countryside had them.


« Last Edit: May 07, 2012, 06:17:22 PM by spgordon »
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Offline JTR

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Re: The Moll-Newhard-Kuntz Triangle of Old Northampton County Gunmaking
« Reply #59 on: May 07, 2012, 11:50:47 PM »
Tic,,,,,,Tic,,,,,,Tic,,,,,Tic,,,,,,,,,,,
John Robbins

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Re: The Moll-Newhard-Kuntz Triangle of Old Northampton County Gunmaking
« Reply #60 on: May 08, 2012, 12:38:03 AM »
Miscellaneous public records of NH county, currently stored at HSP.

In Vol. 1, page 197:  Letter dated July 13, 1756, Timothy Horsfield to William Parsons at Easton:  account of arms held by Daniel Kliest in Bethlehem, 4 "middling good" and 28 "commonly called glass guns, several broken." 

(I have no idea what the term "glass gun" may mean.  Even if the Moravians were using the term "glas" gun, in either German or Dutch it would still indicate glass I believe.  ???)
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Re: The Moll-Newhard-Kuntz Triangle of Old Northampton County Gunmaking
« Reply #61 on: May 08, 2012, 12:50:16 AM »
Paraphrasing here because I'm not going to sit here typing for an hour!

Going back through notes I took when researching Edward Marshall and his infamous rifle; I had found an account of an indian attack, testimony given by a 16 year old named George Ebert of Easton.  I noted it because he mentioned that Marshall's wife had been killed at the Blue Mtn, however he noted that the whole incident (about which he was testifying) began on May 2, 1757, when he and 18 armed men (this does not appear to have been a militia company, as there was no additional testimony of a captain or lieutenant, only a group of men accompanying wagons it would seem) were traveling to the assistance of a group of residents who had been attacked in Lower Smithfield.  This testimony is also in the same book of varied NH Co. public records noted above, page 253.
« Last Edit: May 08, 2012, 12:53:25 AM by Eric Kettenburg »
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Offline spgordon

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Re: The Moll-Newhard-Kuntz Triangle of Old Northampton County Gunmaking
« Reply #62 on: May 08, 2012, 03:21:55 AM »
Bob?   ???

Can someone at least pretend to be Bob?

After the last discussion, which ended in May 2011 or so, Bob stayed off this site for nearly a year. I hope he comes back sooner this time--because I'm eager to see how he modifies his ideas based on the abundant evidence that Eric has provided.
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Offline spgordon

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Re: The Moll-Newhard-Kuntz Triangle of Old Northampton County Gunmaking
« Reply #63 on: May 08, 2012, 03:24:34 AM »
Miscellaneous public records of NH county, currently stored at HSP.

In Vol. 1, page 197:  Letter dated July 13, 1756, Timothy Horsfield to William Parsons at Easton:  account of arms held by Daniel Kliest in Bethlehem, 4 "middling good" and 28 "commonly called glass guns, several broken." 

(I have no idea what the term "glass gun" may mean.  Even if the Moravians were using the term "glas" gun, in either German or Dutch it would still indicate glass I believe.  ???)

Hmmm. The odd thing is that Horsfield suggests that these guns are "commonly called glass guns," which suggests that the term was ... well, common.
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Online Eric Kettenburg

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Re: The Moll-Newhard-Kuntz Triangle of Old Northampton County Gunmaking
« Reply #64 on: May 08, 2012, 03:44:03 AM »
I wonder if it is some type of reference or slang for a blunderbuss?  The reason I mention this:  I know that I have more than one reference ca. 1750s *somewhere* (meaning I distinctly remember them, but currently do not know which huge pile of papers and notes is hiding it) noting that the brethren were trying to obtain blunderbusses (specifically termed "blunderbusses") for Bethlehem and later Nazareth.  Through George Ernst Schlosser, at least on one occasion.

I know all the cartoons when I was a kid showed blunderbusses being loaded with glass and/or nails....  ::) :D :D :D
« Last Edit: May 08, 2012, 03:45:33 AM by Eric Kettenburg »
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Re: The Moll-Newhard-Kuntz Triangle of Old Northampton County Gunmaking
« Reply #65 on: May 08, 2012, 03:51:54 PM »
Ferris Bueller's Day Off?

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Re: The Moll-Newhard-Kuntz Triangle of Old Northampton County Gunmaking
« Reply #66 on: May 08, 2012, 04:55:19 PM »
That is great stuff!!! And my plan worked perfectly if I do say so myself, and I do!!! I figured with a little goading someone would open up the flood gates and start posting some great information. And it would be even better if this information was all collected together and published in a series of books with, of course, some contemporary editing.
« Last Edit: May 09, 2012, 11:28:36 AM by crawdad »

Offline DaveM

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Re: The Moll-Newhard-Kuntz Triangle of Old Northampton County Gunmaking
« Reply #67 on: May 09, 2012, 03:23:50 AM »
I dug out some of my notes also - here is a interest dialog between the Chief of Oneida indians, at a conference with the "northern indians" in August 1762:  The chief, named Thomas King, apparently lived beyond "Mohonoy (Mahonoy?) / "Nixhisaqua". 

Chief:
"...some of our warriors who are here have no guns, and if you will bestow any on them, I desire they may be good.  You are daily making rifles.    I do not know what you do with them.  When you gave me any guns, you gave me yellow stocked ones that are worth nothing (note - maybe birch guns were made for indians?)  I have asked you now four times.  At Easton, you only gave me gun locks.  What, think you, could I do with them, without stocks and barrels?  I make no guns.  After I got the gun locks, I joined myself with General Forbes, and went to war with him, as you ordered me, against the french.  and as soon as I had done it, you still only gave me gun locks." 


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Re: The Moll-Newhard-Kuntz Triangle of Old Northampton County Gunmaking
« Reply #68 on: May 09, 2012, 11:36:38 AM »
Examples of Barter in the economy;
"October 26, 1755:  "Three men came today,- they are Germans from New River, but now living on the Town Fork.  Two of them undertake to make us 3000 shingles in three weeks, the third will fell and trim 100 trees, the pay to be a pair of shoes each."
Could have just as easily been "their pay to be three rifled guns!!"

Another good entry paraphrased of course;
"recall the 1757 entry in the Bethlehem ledger of the Locksmith and Gunstocker whereby Abraham Steiner purchased a gun from the Bethlehem shop to send to his son in Wachovia.."

« Last Edit: May 09, 2012, 11:53:29 AM by crawdad »

Offline Dphariss

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Re: The Moll-Newhard-Kuntz Triangle of Old Northampton County Gunmaking
« Reply #69 on: May 09, 2012, 05:09:12 PM »
If we read Kindig it seems gun work was done on the installment plan as well.

Dan
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Re: The Moll-Newhard-Kuntz Triangle of Old Northampton County Gunmaking
« Reply #70 on: May 09, 2012, 09:24:02 PM »
Miscellaneous public records of NH county, currently stored at HSP.

In Vol. 1, page 197:  Letter dated July 13, 1756, Timothy Horsfield to William Parsons at Easton:  account of arms held by Daniel Kliest in Bethlehem, 4 "middling good" and 28 "commonly called glass guns, several broken." 

(I have no idea what the term "glass gun" may mean.  Even if the Moravians were using the term "glas" gun, in either German or Dutch it would still indicate glass I believe.  ???)

Glass guns? The letter would appear to be written by an Englishman to another Englishman about guns held by a German. Glass could be a Pennsylvania Dutch term for a certain type of gun. From Eugene Stine's Pennsylvania German Dictionary which focuses on the Lehigh-Northampton County variant, glass is defined as class. In the dialect glass is spelled glaas. Pennsylvania Dutch is an odd combination of German, English and dialect words and does vary somewhat from region to region in Pennsylvania. No way of knowing exactly what is meant by glass guns unless some text turns up with a better description. I checked Muhlenberg's 1812 dictionary but there are clues there.

Martin

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Re: The Moll-Newhard-Kuntz Triangle of Old Northampton County Gunmaking
« Reply #71 on: May 09, 2012, 09:57:44 PM »
I really wish it could be explained.  I do have a few other references to Schlosser acquiring arms in Philadelphia for Bethlehem, and also Bethlehem's desire for some swivel guns which I believe were of the form of a large bore blunderbuss mounted on a swivel to be used from a stockade wall.  Possibly, this term is some kind of reference to such a piece - a short, large bored close range defensive arm of some kind.
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Offline spgordon

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Re: The Moll-Newhard-Kuntz Triangle of Old Northampton County Gunmaking
« Reply #72 on: May 09, 2012, 09:58:13 PM »
Interesting.

As you say, Mart, the letter is written from one Englishman to another (Horsfield was in 1756, I believe, a justice of the peace at Bethlehem). So if the term "glass" reproduces something from Pennsylvania Dutch it would be transcribing how Horsfield heard the "common" term. He would have heard "glaas" as "glass" (which would signify "glass" in English) or he could have heard the German "glass" (which would signifiy "class" in English). So this still leaves us with "class" or "glass." But what would a "class gun" be? Was that a "common" term? A "high-class" gun I could understand ... but Horsfield didn't write that...

The Moravians at Bethlehem, however, didn't speak a dialect of Pennsylvania Dutch, did they?

Other possibilities:

"Glatz" means bald... "klotz" means block ... and "glatte" means "smooth": perhaps we have a winner?

Scott
« Last Edit: May 09, 2012, 10:06:10 PM by spgordon »
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Re: The Moll-Newhard-Kuntz Triangle of Old Northampton County Gunmaking
« Reply #73 on: May 11, 2012, 04:52:54 PM »
Keeping it alive as I go through notes.

NH Co. records at HSP, microfilm, roll MFilmXR 698

Letter:  Lewis Weiss to Timothy Horsfield at Bethlehem, August 1763
Weiss had spoken to 3 of Governor's commissioners, told them he wants arms, especially blunderbusses, for Bethlehem and Nazareth.  There were arms for sale at auction (in Philadelphia) the coming week, Schlosser would buy them for Bethlehem if the commissioners did not.  William Hoffman had 3 swivels for Bethlehem.

Letter:  Later letter from Weiss in Philadelphia to Horsfield August 1763
Mr. Schlosser bought arms for Bethlehem, hoped bill would be paid by province when commissioners provide for the frontier.

Letter: Lt. Jonathan Dodge at Fort Allen to Horsfield at Bethlehem August 1763
Guns supplied by provice were bad, "not one in 10 that would kill a man in ten times shooting."
(Is this indicating the apparently common misfire issue?)


Also:  on microfilm MFilmXR 703 are a number of NH county treasurer's payments ca. 1754-1756, and a LARGE number of these are bounty payments for squirrels (??? this seems weird - attack squirrels!), fox and wolf heads.  Let me reiterate - a LOT of bounty payments, well over half to German names.  (A good number to Edward Marshall too, which is what I was originally looking for at the time).  Now, I suppose we could debate whether or not these were being *trapped* or shot.  I can;t answer that, just putting it out there.  Like Bob Lienemann, the superhero of impartial research once said to me (and I STILL remember it), "just put the information out there and let people make up their own minds."

(Where's the fun in that Bob?  ;D ;D )
« Last Edit: May 11, 2012, 04:55:40 PM by Eric Kettenburg »
Strange women lying in ponds, distributing swords, is no basis for a system of government!

mkeen

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Re: The Moll-Newhard-Kuntz Triangle of Old Northampton County Gunmaking
« Reply #74 on: May 13, 2012, 08:03:02 PM »
More on glass guns.  Eugene Stine's dictionary of the Lehigh-Northampton dialect defines Glattbix as a "smooth bore rifle". His definition not mine. Rifle would not be the proper term. This would show that Glatt was used to describe a smooth bore gun. If all the Germans in the area are describing a smooth bore gun as Glatt it is no stretch to see how an Englishman would interpret the sound as glass.

Martin